World travel with type 1 diabetes using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion

Alexander R Charlton, Jessica R Charlton

Abstract


Living with type 1 diabetes and using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), the authors travelled together for four months through 11 countries. Travelling with type 1 diabetes presents various added challenges. Personal experience of the challenges faced by the authors in relation to their diabetes are discussed along with the ways they were able to overcome these challenges. A review of general aspects one may encounter when travelling with type 1 diabetes and CSII follows. This provides an insightful overview for individuals living with type 1 diabetes intending to travel as well as healthcare professionals involved in providing care to those with type 1 diabetes intending to travel.

Keywords


type 1 diabetes, travel, insulin, climate, altitude, flight, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, CSII, airport security, metabolism, physiology, glucose

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.15277/bjd.2019.224

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The Journal of the Association of British Clinical Diabetologists